Above: Todays 30K Best-Level SAR training footprint comes from the other side of the "[...] luminous drawbridge trough which the story has to reach the audience and the audience has to acces the story..."  -- holding the 35- and 16mm Kodak Vision 3 filmstock, while standing at editing-desk: "Food should be something to chew on, right?"¹

"It is our natural birthright to be fit and healthy. Unfortunately, science and medicine have largely missed this point. Researchers look boldly to the future, to new medicines, genetic screening, and surgical procedures, yet never ask the question, "Why do we need theses advances?" and "Is there a simpler, better way to health and wellness?" If they were to ask these questions, they would realise that the key to the puzzle is to start at the beginning. Our health researchers, who currently lack a framework from which to assess the staggering volume of information they generate every day, flounder with basic questions: "What should we eat?" "How much and what types of exercise should we do?" "How can we live a healthy life?" Although these may seem like sound questions for health researchers to ask, the answers constantly change in response to politics, lobbying and the media. As a result, their recommendations are not based on science, but rather lobbying and political manoeuvring. [F] ew people make a real attempt to fix this mess. But who can really blame them. After all, it's hard as hell to make money off healthy people… unless you sell bicycles, running shoes or teach dance classes." 

Robb Wolf in 'The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet' on page 34 'Stop! Savannah Time!' (first published in 2010)

On- and off-site references: (anatomy)


¹ Peter de Bie, in an interview we conducted in 2007 for our upcoming film 'Here Comes Big Trouble' (photographed on the filmfootage above, shot in 2007 in IJmuiden, The Netherlands)